Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a degenerative neurological disorder characterized by a loss of functional connections between different areas of the brain. AD is considered a cortical dementia, thus Electroencephalography (EEG) has been used as a tool for diagnosing AD for the last two decades. Often, the hallmarks of EEG abnormality in AD patients are a shift of the power spectrum to lower frequencies and reduced coherences among cortical regions, however, it is still mostly unknown how these abnormalities evolve together with the disease progression. In this paper we proposed a longitudinal study of the EEG of three AD patients in order to study the disease progression, from the coherence point of view, over the four major EEG sub-bands: delta, theta, alpha and beta. The EEG was recorded at time T0 and then after three months (time T1). We proposed a coherence based hierarchical clustering method to group the electrodes together according to their mutual pairwise coherence, in order to evaluate how the brain connectivity changed along with the disease in the spectral domain. The results provide an in-depth view of the structure of electrode interconnection of every single patient in every sub-band at time T0 and time T1. This study endorsed the commonly shared belief that coherence reduces over time but it revealed that coherence spatial distribution changes in a different way, from patient to patient. The results also showed that a patient-specific brain connectivity analysis is possible and that a personalized analysis of the disease's progression might provide valuable diagnostic information. In the near future, the study will be extended to a larger dataset in order to validate the method statistically.

Hierarchical clustering of the electroencephalogram spectral coherence to study the changes in brain connectivity in Alzheimer's disease

Mammone N;Campolo M;MORABITO, Francesco Carlo
2016

Abstract

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a degenerative neurological disorder characterized by a loss of functional connections between different areas of the brain. AD is considered a cortical dementia, thus Electroencephalography (EEG) has been used as a tool for diagnosing AD for the last two decades. Often, the hallmarks of EEG abnormality in AD patients are a shift of the power spectrum to lower frequencies and reduced coherences among cortical regions, however, it is still mostly unknown how these abnormalities evolve together with the disease progression. In this paper we proposed a longitudinal study of the EEG of three AD patients in order to study the disease progression, from the coherence point of view, over the four major EEG sub-bands: delta, theta, alpha and beta. The EEG was recorded at time T0 and then after three months (time T1). We proposed a coherence based hierarchical clustering method to group the electrodes together according to their mutual pairwise coherence, in order to evaluate how the brain connectivity changed along with the disease in the spectral domain. The results provide an in-depth view of the structure of electrode interconnection of every single patient in every sub-band at time T0 and time T1. This study endorsed the commonly shared belief that coherence reduces over time but it revealed that coherence spatial distribution changes in a different way, from patient to patient. The results also showed that a patient-specific brain connectivity analysis is possible and that a personalized analysis of the disease's progression might provide valuable diagnostic information. In the near future, the study will be extended to a larger dataset in order to validate the method statistically.
Cluster analysis; EEG Signal Processing; Alzheimer's Disease
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12318/12181
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