Environmental design and the field of technology for architecture have always been recognisable in their approach to the project, through the contemporary declination of the meanings that underlie them and the study of the complexity that characterises them (Nardi, 2008, p. 81; Campioli and Lavagna, 2013, p. X; Perriccioli, 2021, p. XIII-XIV). The complexity of the systems - and their meanings - that govern the anthropic and social spheres, their repercussions on the natural system and the quasi-deterministic consequences that can be derived from them require new approaches to the 'architecture of the city', the technological systems and the environmental systems that constitute it. In particular, the approach proposed here is an advanced one, identifiable in the "advanced design process" (Nava, 2019), which can be described as the set of design strategies and transformations of the built environment, operable within the experimental construction of an advanced type of design. Specifically, the process is implemented by putting in place a system [1] information, [2] resources and [3] devices. Consequently, an advanced design is configured for the complex management of contemporary issues of architectural and urban interest. [1] With reference to climate change, complex management is made necessary by the insistence of ecosystemic issues, resulting from the acceleration of the natural process of global warming (Cox et al., 2000; de Saedeleer, 2016). Indeed, this ecosystemic character places the contemporary planner in an attitude of constant "oscillation" between understanding global phenomena and translating them into local dynamics, or vice versa, influencing the degree of information that can be used at the time of design. [2] Moreover, by integrating in the presented scenario also the limitedness and scarcity of available resources (Schewe, 2013; Flörke et al., 2018) and the need to zero out the production of waste (Ajayi et al., 2017), this process becomes capable of managing resources according to the logic of upcycling of material and natural flows, currently widely investigated (Baiani and Altamura, 2018; Costa et al, 2018; Nava and Lucanto, 2020), by means of circular processes and regenerative approaches; in particular, the latter require an effort higher than the reduction of negative impacts, directing the project towards a real production of positive impacts (Ceschin and Gaziulusoy, 2016). [3] Finally, to support the retrieval and interpretation of information and the initiation of circular processes, an advanced design process makes use of technologies, which are therefore defined as "enabling". The dissemination of the term "enabling technologies" originates within the European programme "Horizon 2020" for the promotion of technology-driven competitiveness and innovation. The European Commission (EC, nd) defines KETs (Key Enabling Technologies) as "knowledge-intensive technologies associated with high R&D intensity, rapid innovation cycles, substantial investment expenditure and highly skilled jobs". In the context of architecture and territory, "enabling" technologies can be defined as "tangible and intangible technologies, capable of bringing significant changes in the perception and use of spaces" both open and closed (Ottone and Cocci Grifoni, 2017). Thus, these are physical and digital systems that redefine and expand the domain of possibilities for the functioning of an urban organism, in order to respond to the effects arising from some of the major global challenges: global warming, population growth, resource availability, diffuse knowledge. For example, digital technologies enable advanced design processes by providing accessible, comprehensible and easily disseminated information, while physical technologies relate to the technological language of design for environmental and technological performance; such technologies are often implemented or include the physical components for digital systems, integrated into technological systems for high environmental performance. In fact, within this thesis, a technology is defined as "enabling" whenever it proves capable of initiating virtuous processes, through the intervention of the physical, digital and environmental spheres, in an integrated manner. Consistently, an advanced design process implies radical transformations that, with reference to the phenomena related to climate change, are called to assume the emergent character, or the resilient one, referring to the capacity of a system and its component parts to anticipate, absorb, accommodate or recover from the effects of a damaging event in a timely and efficient manner [...] (IPCC, 2012, p. 563.) Such 'emergence' clearly requires cultural structural support, which, within the thesis, is identified in radical adaptation and mitigation strategies and active policies of community knowledge, adaptation and information. It will be noted how such resilient transformations, which define Advanced Resilient Design, apply resilience requirements to technological and environmental design performance and assume the useful timeframe of advanced resilient processes (short to long term), for immediate actions and long term strategies/visions. Resilient advanced design transformations characterise a complex contemporaneity, are increasingly necessary and propose a new normality that makes risk and emergency possible opportunities for anticipation and change of direction, through the adoption of sustainable circular models. In this scenario, 'urban districts in transition' are emerging, districts that apply enabling technologies and advanced design strategies to initiate resilient and agile processes, abandoning linear development models and producing positive impacts. In this respect, there are already experimental urban contexts and others that need knowledge tools that can "induce" a process of community transition and the generation of resilient urban districts. However, to date, there is no operational methodology in the literature for transferring advanced processes from one virtuous context to others, even very different ones. For example, with regard to designing for climate change, the Netherlands is an advanced if highly fragile area; years of experimentation and engineering technologies have supported a substantial advancement in water defence technologies. In recent years, Dutch cities are moving closer to the commitment sought by the European Union, changing their approach, rediscovering the capacity of nature-based solutions and focusing on circular operating models (Luijendijk and van Oudenhoven, 2019). Water technologies, in particular, rediscover a new character of architecture in the development of resilient districts, new urban design performance for advanced design, a different design engagement and new roles of designers for advanced processes, in strategies, urban policies and design design (Roest et. al, 2016; Etchepare and Van der Hoek, 2015). The science of architecture and the territory, is configured as an open science, even more transdisciplinary. On the other hand, the Southern Periphery of Reggio Calabria presents a very low quality of life, especially during extreme events such as flooding and water shortage. In line with what has been discussed so far, therefore, it appears of great interest to investigate the enabling technologies for the efficiency of the project and the effectiveness of the advanced process, experimenting with the activation of information and innovation processes of advanced living models and quality of life. For these reasons, the Southern Suburbs of Reggio Calabria have been identified as a context in which to start exporting the Dutch operational methodology. The proposed thesis investigates the Advanced Design Process and the enabling technologies for this process, for the realisation of resilient transformations within urban districts in transition, through the construction of an operational methodology, still absent in the literature of the sector. The cultural and scientific scenario is identified with reference to the emerging urban and social issues arising from climate change and the scarcity of resources essential to human activities. In this scenario, the "advanced design process" is described as the set of design strategies and transformations of the built environment, operable within the experimental construction of advanced design. The research approach is transdisciplinary and systemic, while the methodology refers to frontier research, due to the complexity of the systems governing the anthropic and social spheres and their effects on the natural system. The method identified is 'inverted funnel', according to which, starting from experiences, one contributes scientifically to the construction of a theory, through the definition of new contemporary paradigms and the redefinition of existing ones. In the field of design for resilience in the built environment, the process implements Advanced Resilient Design (ARD) of a regenerative type. With reference to ARD, the process is implemented by putting in place: [1] information, for the management of complexity at the frontier scales, [2] climate, water and soil resources and [3] devices, understood as "enabling technologies" (physical and digital) for resilient transformation processes. What has been identified reveals that the advanced process implies radical changes, in which architectural design and technology contribute to transformations of a technical-urban type, through environmental design and the construction of enabling skills (a) and of a cultural type of communities, through the transfer of knowledge on issues related to climate change and urban sustainability (b). Consequently, following the method adopted, starting from the case study experiences of the Dutch water cities of Amsterdam, Rotterdam and Eindhoven, and from the application of technologies and strategies identified through some experiences of design collaboration, an application of the advanced design process to the southern suburbs of Reggio Calabria is attempted, for the transfer of knowledge and the construction of competences (a)(b) (through the Sustainable Advanced Design Workshop within the KnowledgeVsClimateChange project and the Atelier di Tesi "Fragile Territories" activities) and for the urban technical transformations of the Advanced Design process (a) (by carrying out technological design scenarios in the southern suburbs of RC for 2030-2050-2085). Finally, the process thus defined, identifies cultural and scientific nodes and new research trajectories, necessary for the investigation of the questions left open.

La progettazione ambientale e il settore delle tecnologie per l’architettura sono da sempre riconoscibili nel loro approccio al progetto, attraverso la declinazione contemporanea dei significati che sottendono e lo studio nella complessità che li caratterizza (Nardi, 2008, p. 81; Campioli e Lavagna, 2013, p. X; Perriccioli, 2021, p. XIII-XIV). La complessità dei sistemi - e dei relativi significati- che governano la sfera antropica e sociale, le loro ricadute sul sistema naturale e le conseguenze quasi deterministiche da esse derivabili richiedono nuovi approcci all’«architettura della città», ai sistemi tecnologici e ai sistemi ambientali che la costituiscono. In particolare, l’approccio qui proposto è di tipo avanzato, individuabile nel «processo di design avanzato» (Advanced Design Process) (Nava, 2019), descrivibile come l’insieme delle strategie progettuali e delle trasformazioni dell’ambiente costruito, operabili nell’ambito della costruzione sperimentale di un design di tipo avanzato. Nello specifico, il processo è posto in essere ponendo a sistema [1] informazioni, [2] risorse e [3] dispositivi. Di conseguenza, si configura un design avanzato atto alla gestione complessa di questioni contemporanee, di interesse architettonico e urbano. [1] Con riferimento al cambiamento climatico, la gestione complessa è resa necessaria dall’insistenza di problematiche di carattere ecosistemico, derivanti dall’accelerazione del processo naturale di riscaldamento globale (Cox et al., 2000; de Saedeleer, 2016). Infatti, tale carattere ecosistemico pone il progettista contemporaneo in un atteggiamento di costante “oscillazione” tra la comprensione dei fenomeni globali e la loro traduzione in dinamiche locali, o viceversa, influenzando il grado di informazioni utilizzabili all’atto della progettazione. [2] Inoltre, integrando nello scenario presentato anche la limitatezza e la scarsità di risorse a disposizione (Schewe, 2013; Flörke et al., 2018) e la necessità di azzerare la produzione di rifiuti (Ajayi et al., 2017), tale processo si rende capace di gestire le risorse secondo la logica dell’upcycling di flussi materiali e naturali, attualmente ampiamente indagata (Baiani e Altamura, 2018; Costa et al., 2018; Nava e Lucanto, 2020), per mezzo di processi circolari e approcci rigenerativi; in particolare, questi ultimi richiedono uno sforzo superiore alla riduzione di impatti negativi, indirizzando il progetto verso una vera e propria produzione di impatti positivi (Ceschin e Gaziulusoy, 2016). [3] Infine, a supporto del reperimento e dell’interpretazione delle informazioni e dell’avvio di processi circolari, un processo di design avanzato si serve di tecnologie, perciò definite “abilitanti”. La diffusione dell’espressione «tecnologie abilitanti» ha origine nell’ambito del programma europeo “Horizon 2020” per la promozione di competitività e innovazione di matrice tecnologica. La Commissione Europea (Commissione Europea, nd) definisce le KETs (Key Enabling Technologies): “tecnologie ad alta intensità di conoscenza e associate a elevata intensità di R&S, a cicli di innovazione rapidi, a consistenti spese di investimento e a posti di lavoro altamente qualificati”. Nell’ambito dell’architettura e del territorio, possono essere definite “abilitanti” le tecnologie “tangibili e intangibili, capaci di apportare cambiamenti significativi nella percezione e nell’uso di spazi” aperti e chiusi (Ottone e Cocci Grifoni, 2017). Dunque, si tratta di sistemi fisici e digitali che ridefiniscono, ampliandolo, il dominio delle possibilità di funzionamento di un organismo urbano, per rispondere agli effetti derivanti da alcune delle principali sfide mondiali: riscaldamento globale, aumento della popolazione, disponibilità delle risorse, conoscenza diffusa. Ad esempio, le tecnologie digitali abilitano processi di design avanzato fornendo informazioni accessibili, comprensibili e facilmente diffondibili, mentre le tecnologie fisiche afferiscono al linguaggio tecnologico di progetto per le prestazioni ambientali e tecnologiche; tali tecnologie sono spesso implementate o comprendono le componenti fisiche per i sistemi digitali, integrate nei sistemi tecnologici per elevate prestazioni ambientali. Di fatto, all’interno della presente tesi, una tecnologia si definisce “abilitante” ogni qualvolta si dimostra capace di avviare processi virtuosi, tramite l’intervento sulle sfere fisica, digitale e ambientale, in maniera integrata. Coerentemente, un processo di design avanzato implica trasformazioni dai caratteri radicali che, con riferimento ai fenomeni connessi ai cambiamenti climatici, sono chiamate ad assumere il carattere emergente, ovvero quello resiliente, riferibile alla capacità di un sistema e delle sue parti componenti di anticipare, assorbire, accomodare o riprendersi dagli effetti di un evento dannoso in modo tempestivo ed efficiente [...] (IPCC, 2012, p. 563. Traduzione mia). Tale “emergenza”, chiaramente, richiede un supporto strutturale culturale che, all’interno della tesi, è individuato in strategie di adattamento e mitigazione radicali e politiche attive di conoscenza, adattamento e informazione delle comunità. Si noterà come tali trasformazioni resilienti, che definiscono l’Advanced Resilient Design, applicano i requisiti di resilienza alle prestazioni tecnologiche e ambientali di progetto e assumono i tempi utili ai processi avanzati resilienti (breve-lungo termine), per azioni immediate e strategie/visioni al lungo termine. Trasformazioni di design avanzato resiliente caratterizzano una contemporaneità complessa, si rendono sempre più necessari e propongono una nuova normalità che fa del rischio e dell’emergenza possibili occasioni di anticipazione e cambio di direzione, tramite l’adozione di modelli circolari sostenibili. In tale scenario, si vengono a configurare i “distretti urbani in transizione”, distretti che applicano tecnologie abilitanti e le strategie del design avanzato per avviare processi resilienti e agili, abbandonando modelli di sviluppo lineari e realizzando la produzione di impatti positivi. A riguardo, esistono già contesti urbani sperimentali ed altri che necessitano di strumenti di conoscenza che possano “indurre” un processo di transizione delle comunità e la generazione di distretti urbani resilienti. Tuttavia, ad oggi, non esiste in letteratura una metodologia operativa per il trasferimento di processi avanzati da un contesto virtuoso ad altri, anche molto differenti. Ad esempio, con riferimento alla progettazione per i cambiamenti climatici, i Paesi Bassi rappresentano un territorio avanzato seppur fortemente fragile; anni di sperimentazioni e tecnologie ingegneristiche hanno supportato un avanzamento sostanziale nell’ambito delle tecnologie per la difesa dall’acqua. Negli ultimi anni, le città olandesi si avvicinano maggiormente all’impegno voluto dall’Unione Europea, cambiando approccio, riscoprendo la capacità delle soluzioni «nature-based» e concentrandosi su modelli di funzionamento circolari (Luijendijk e van Oudenhoven, 2019). Le tecnologie per l’acqua, in particolare, riscoprono un nuovo carattere dell’architettura nello sviluppo di distretti resilienti, nuove prestazioni del disegno urbano per il design avanzato, un differente impegno progettuale e nuovi ruoli dei progettisti per i processi avanzati, in strategie, politiche urbane e disegno progettuale (Roest et. al, 2016; Etchepare e Van der Hoek, 2015). La scienza dell’architettura e del territorio, si configura come una scienza aperta, ancor più transdisciplinare. Di contro, la Periferia Sud di Reggio Calabria presenta una qualità di vita di livello molto basso, specie in occasione di eventi estremi quali allagamenti e insufficienza idrica. In coerenza con quanto discusso finora, dunque, appare di grande interesse indagare le tecnologie abilitanti l’efficienza del progetto e l’efficacia del processo avanzati, sperimentando l’attivazione di processi di informazione e innovazione dei modelli del vivere avanzati e della qualità di vita. Per questi motivi, la Periferia Sud di Reggio Calabria è stata individuata come contesto in cui avviare un’esportazione della metodologia operativa olandese. La tesi proposta indaga il processo di design avanzato (Advanced Design Process) e le tecnologie abilitanti tale processo, per la realizzazione di trasformazioni resilienti nell’ambito di distretti urbani in transizione, attraverso la costruzione di una metodologia operativa, ancora assente nella letteratura di settore. Lo scenario culturale e scientifico è individuato con riferimento alle emergenti questioni urbane e sociali derivanti dai cambiamenti climatici e dalla scarsità di risorse indispensabili alle attività umane. In tale scenario, il «processo di design avanzato» è descritto come l’insieme delle strategie progettuali e delle trasformazioni dell’ambiente costruito, operabili nell’ambito della costruzione sperimentale di un design di tipo avanzato. L’approccio di ricerca è di tipo transdisciplinare e sistemico, mentre la metodologia riferisce alla ricerca di frontiera, per via della complessità dei sistemi che governano la sfera antropica e sociale e le loro ricadute sul sistema naturale. Il metodo individuato è “ad imbuto rovesciato”, secondo il quale, partendo dalle esperienze, si contribuisce scientificamente alla costruzione di una teoria, attraverso la definizione di nuovi paradigmi contemporanei e la ridefinizione di altri esistenti. Nell’ambito della progettazione per la resilienza nell’ambiente costruito, il processo realizza l’Advanced Resilient Design (ARD) di tipo rigenerativo. Con riferimento all’ARD il processo è posto in essere ponendo a sistema: [1] informazioni, per la gestione della complessità alle scale di frontiera, [2] risorse clima, acqua e suolo e [3] dispositivi, intesi come “tecnologie abilitanti” (fisiche e digitali) i processi di trasformazione resiliente. Quanto individuato rivela che il processo avanzato implica cambiamenti radicali, in cui il progetto e la tecnologia dell’architettura contribuiscono alle trasformazioni di tipo tecnico-urbano, attraverso la progettazione ambientale e la costruzione di competenze abilitanti (a) e di tipo culturale delle comunità, attraverso il trasferimento di conoscenze sui temi connessi al cambiamento climatico e alla sostenibilità urbana (b). Di conseguenza, seguendo il metodo adottato, partendo dalle esperienze casi studio delle città d’acqua olandesi di Amsterdam, Rotterdam e Eindhoven, e dall’applicazione di tecnologie e strategie individuate attraverso alcune esperienze di collaborazione progettuale, si tenta un’applicazione del processo di design avanzato alla periferia sud di Reggio Calabria, per il trasferimento di conoscenze e la costruzione di competenze (a)(b) (attraverso il Workshop Sustainable Advanced Design nell’ambito del progetto KnowledgeVsClimateChange e delle attività di Atelier di Tesi “Territori fragili”) e per le trasformazioni tecniche urbane del processo di Advanced Design (a) (realizzando scenari di progettazione tecnologica in periferia sud a RC per il 2030-2050-2085). Infine, il processo così definito, individua nodi culturali e scientifici e nuove traiettorie di ricerca, necessarie all’indagine delle questioni lasciate aperte.

Advanced design process e tecnologie abilitanti. il processo di trasformazione resiliente dei distretti urbani in transizione: progettare per il cambiamento climatico. Dall'esperienza delle città d'acqua olandesi, l'esportabilità di una metodologia operativa per la periferia sud a Reggio Calabria / Leuzzo, Alessia. - (2022 Mar 28).

Advanced design process e tecnologie abilitanti. il processo di trasformazione resiliente dei distretti urbani in transizione: progettare per il cambiamento climatico. Dall'esperienza delle città d'acqua olandesi, l'esportabilità di una metodologia operativa per la periferia sud a Reggio Calabria

Leuzzo, Alessia
2022

Abstract

La progettazione ambientale e il settore delle tecnologie per l’architettura sono da sempre riconoscibili nel loro approccio al progetto, attraverso la declinazione contemporanea dei significati che sottendono e lo studio nella complessità che li caratterizza (Nardi, 2008, p. 81; Campioli e Lavagna, 2013, p. X; Perriccioli, 2021, p. XIII-XIV). La complessità dei sistemi - e dei relativi significati- che governano la sfera antropica e sociale, le loro ricadute sul sistema naturale e le conseguenze quasi deterministiche da esse derivabili richiedono nuovi approcci all’«architettura della città», ai sistemi tecnologici e ai sistemi ambientali che la costituiscono. In particolare, l’approccio qui proposto è di tipo avanzato, individuabile nel «processo di design avanzato» (Advanced Design Process) (Nava, 2019), descrivibile come l’insieme delle strategie progettuali e delle trasformazioni dell’ambiente costruito, operabili nell’ambito della costruzione sperimentale di un design di tipo avanzato. Nello specifico, il processo è posto in essere ponendo a sistema [1] informazioni, [2] risorse e [3] dispositivi. Di conseguenza, si configura un design avanzato atto alla gestione complessa di questioni contemporanee, di interesse architettonico e urbano. [1] Con riferimento al cambiamento climatico, la gestione complessa è resa necessaria dall’insistenza di problematiche di carattere ecosistemico, derivanti dall’accelerazione del processo naturale di riscaldamento globale (Cox et al., 2000; de Saedeleer, 2016). Infatti, tale carattere ecosistemico pone il progettista contemporaneo in un atteggiamento di costante “oscillazione” tra la comprensione dei fenomeni globali e la loro traduzione in dinamiche locali, o viceversa, influenzando il grado di informazioni utilizzabili all’atto della progettazione. [2] Inoltre, integrando nello scenario presentato anche la limitatezza e la scarsità di risorse a disposizione (Schewe, 2013; Flörke et al., 2018) e la necessità di azzerare la produzione di rifiuti (Ajayi et al., 2017), tale processo si rende capace di gestire le risorse secondo la logica dell’upcycling di flussi materiali e naturali, attualmente ampiamente indagata (Baiani e Altamura, 2018; Costa et al., 2018; Nava e Lucanto, 2020), per mezzo di processi circolari e approcci rigenerativi; in particolare, questi ultimi richiedono uno sforzo superiore alla riduzione di impatti negativi, indirizzando il progetto verso una vera e propria produzione di impatti positivi (Ceschin e Gaziulusoy, 2016). [3] Infine, a supporto del reperimento e dell’interpretazione delle informazioni e dell’avvio di processi circolari, un processo di design avanzato si serve di tecnologie, perciò definite “abilitanti”. La diffusione dell’espressione «tecnologie abilitanti» ha origine nell’ambito del programma europeo “Horizon 2020” per la promozione di competitività e innovazione di matrice tecnologica. La Commissione Europea (Commissione Europea, nd) definisce le KETs (Key Enabling Technologies): “tecnologie ad alta intensità di conoscenza e associate a elevata intensità di R&S, a cicli di innovazione rapidi, a consistenti spese di investimento e a posti di lavoro altamente qualificati”. Nell’ambito dell’architettura e del territorio, possono essere definite “abilitanti” le tecnologie “tangibili e intangibili, capaci di apportare cambiamenti significativi nella percezione e nell’uso di spazi” aperti e chiusi (Ottone e Cocci Grifoni, 2017). Dunque, si tratta di sistemi fisici e digitali che ridefiniscono, ampliandolo, il dominio delle possibilità di funzionamento di un organismo urbano, per rispondere agli effetti derivanti da alcune delle principali sfide mondiali: riscaldamento globale, aumento della popolazione, disponibilità delle risorse, conoscenza diffusa. Ad esempio, le tecnologie digitali abilitano processi di design avanzato fornendo informazioni accessibili, comprensibili e facilmente diffondibili, mentre le tecnologie fisiche afferiscono al linguaggio tecnologico di progetto per le prestazioni ambientali e tecnologiche; tali tecnologie sono spesso implementate o comprendono le componenti fisiche per i sistemi digitali, integrate nei sistemi tecnologici per elevate prestazioni ambientali. Di fatto, all’interno della presente tesi, una tecnologia si definisce “abilitante” ogni qualvolta si dimostra capace di avviare processi virtuosi, tramite l’intervento sulle sfere fisica, digitale e ambientale, in maniera integrata. Coerentemente, un processo di design avanzato implica trasformazioni dai caratteri radicali che, con riferimento ai fenomeni connessi ai cambiamenti climatici, sono chiamate ad assumere il carattere emergente, ovvero quello resiliente, riferibile alla capacità di un sistema e delle sue parti componenti di anticipare, assorbire, accomodare o riprendersi dagli effetti di un evento dannoso in modo tempestivo ed efficiente [...] (IPCC, 2012, p. 563. Traduzione mia). Tale “emergenza”, chiaramente, richiede un supporto strutturale culturale che, all’interno della tesi, è individuato in strategie di adattamento e mitigazione radicali e politiche attive di conoscenza, adattamento e informazione delle comunità. Si noterà come tali trasformazioni resilienti, che definiscono l’Advanced Resilient Design, applicano i requisiti di resilienza alle prestazioni tecnologiche e ambientali di progetto e assumono i tempi utili ai processi avanzati resilienti (breve-lungo termine), per azioni immediate e strategie/visioni al lungo termine. Trasformazioni di design avanzato resiliente caratterizzano una contemporaneità complessa, si rendono sempre più necessari e propongono una nuova normalità che fa del rischio e dell’emergenza possibili occasioni di anticipazione e cambio di direzione, tramite l’adozione di modelli circolari sostenibili. In tale scenario, si vengono a configurare i “distretti urbani in transizione”, distretti che applicano tecnologie abilitanti e le strategie del design avanzato per avviare processi resilienti e agili, abbandonando modelli di sviluppo lineari e realizzando la produzione di impatti positivi. A riguardo, esistono già contesti urbani sperimentali ed altri che necessitano di strumenti di conoscenza che possano “indurre” un processo di transizione delle comunità e la generazione di distretti urbani resilienti. Tuttavia, ad oggi, non esiste in letteratura una metodologia operativa per il trasferimento di processi avanzati da un contesto virtuoso ad altri, anche molto differenti. Ad esempio, con riferimento alla progettazione per i cambiamenti climatici, i Paesi Bassi rappresentano un territorio avanzato seppur fortemente fragile; anni di sperimentazioni e tecnologie ingegneristiche hanno supportato un avanzamento sostanziale nell’ambito delle tecnologie per la difesa dall’acqua. Negli ultimi anni, le città olandesi si avvicinano maggiormente all’impegno voluto dall’Unione Europea, cambiando approccio, riscoprendo la capacità delle soluzioni «nature-based» e concentrandosi su modelli di funzionamento circolari (Luijendijk e van Oudenhoven, 2019). Le tecnologie per l’acqua, in particolare, riscoprono un nuovo carattere dell’architettura nello sviluppo di distretti resilienti, nuove prestazioni del disegno urbano per il design avanzato, un differente impegno progettuale e nuovi ruoli dei progettisti per i processi avanzati, in strategie, politiche urbane e disegno progettuale (Roest et. al, 2016; Etchepare e Van der Hoek, 2015). La scienza dell’architettura e del territorio, si configura come una scienza aperta, ancor più transdisciplinare. Di contro, la Periferia Sud di Reggio Calabria presenta una qualità di vita di livello molto basso, specie in occasione di eventi estremi quali allagamenti e insufficienza idrica. In coerenza con quanto discusso finora, dunque, appare di grande interesse indagare le tecnologie abilitanti l’efficienza del progetto e l’efficacia del processo avanzati, sperimentando l’attivazione di processi di informazione e innovazione dei modelli del vivere avanzati e della qualità di vita. Per questi motivi, la Periferia Sud di Reggio Calabria è stata individuata come contesto in cui avviare un’esportazione della metodologia operativa olandese. La tesi proposta indaga il processo di design avanzato (Advanced Design Process) e le tecnologie abilitanti tale processo, per la realizzazione di trasformazioni resilienti nell’ambito di distretti urbani in transizione, attraverso la costruzione di una metodologia operativa, ancora assente nella letteratura di settore. Lo scenario culturale e scientifico è individuato con riferimento alle emergenti questioni urbane e sociali derivanti dai cambiamenti climatici e dalla scarsità di risorse indispensabili alle attività umane. In tale scenario, il «processo di design avanzato» è descritto come l’insieme delle strategie progettuali e delle trasformazioni dell’ambiente costruito, operabili nell’ambito della costruzione sperimentale di un design di tipo avanzato. L’approccio di ricerca è di tipo transdisciplinare e sistemico, mentre la metodologia riferisce alla ricerca di frontiera, per via della complessità dei sistemi che governano la sfera antropica e sociale e le loro ricadute sul sistema naturale. Il metodo individuato è “ad imbuto rovesciato”, secondo il quale, partendo dalle esperienze, si contribuisce scientificamente alla costruzione di una teoria, attraverso la definizione di nuovi paradigmi contemporanei e la ridefinizione di altri esistenti. Nell’ambito della progettazione per la resilienza nell’ambiente costruito, il processo realizza l’Advanced Resilient Design (ARD) di tipo rigenerativo. Con riferimento all’ARD il processo è posto in essere ponendo a sistema: [1] informazioni, per la gestione della complessità alle scale di frontiera, [2] risorse clima, acqua e suolo e [3] dispositivi, intesi come “tecnologie abilitanti” (fisiche e digitali) i processi di trasformazione resiliente. Quanto individuato rivela che il processo avanzato implica cambiamenti radicali, in cui il progetto e la tecnologia dell’architettura contribuiscono alle trasformazioni di tipo tecnico-urbano, attraverso la progettazione ambientale e la costruzione di competenze abilitanti (a) e di tipo culturale delle comunità, attraverso il trasferimento di conoscenze sui temi connessi al cambiamento climatico e alla sostenibilità urbana (b). Di conseguenza, seguendo il metodo adottato, partendo dalle esperienze casi studio delle città d’acqua olandesi di Amsterdam, Rotterdam e Eindhoven, e dall’applicazione di tecnologie e strategie individuate attraverso alcune esperienze di collaborazione progettuale, si tenta un’applicazione del processo di design avanzato alla periferia sud di Reggio Calabria, per il trasferimento di conoscenze e la costruzione di competenze (a)(b) (attraverso il Workshop Sustainable Advanced Design nell’ambito del progetto KnowledgeVsClimateChange e delle attività di Atelier di Tesi “Territori fragili”) e per le trasformazioni tecniche urbane del processo di Advanced Design (a) (realizzando scenari di progettazione tecnologica in periferia sud a RC per il 2030-2050-2085). Infine, il processo così definito, individua nodi culturali e scientifici e nuove traiettorie di ricerca, necessarie all’indagine delle questioni lasciate aperte.
Settore ICAR/12 - TECNOLOGIA DELL'ARCHITETTURA
SANTINI, Adolfo
NAVA, Consuelo
SANTINI, Adolfo
Doctoral Thesis
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
Leuzzo Alessia (1).pdf

accesso aperto

Tipologia: Tesi di dottorato
Licenza: DRM non definito
Dimensione 132.55 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
132.55 MB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12318/129430
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact