Several anchovies species are captured all over the world; they are consumed fresh but also preserved by the industry, either by brine‐fermentation or canning in oil. The industrial process generates large amounts of residue (about 50% of the original fish biomass) that is generally used to produce fish flour. In this paper, the advancement of a recently proposed process for the full valorisation of anchovies aimed at the extraction of fish oil (to be used as an omega‐3 source) and at the production of biomethane through anaerobic digestion is presented. Particularly, in the experiments presented, a co‐digestion of anchovy sludge—used as a nitrogen supplement—and market waste (5% and 95% on a Total Solids basis) was performed. Since the proposed extraction process uses, as a green‐solvent, d‐limonene, the well‐known problems of toxicity for the anaerobic biomass must be overcome during the digestion process. As discussed below, the granular activated carbon (GAC) is used to reclaim and improve anaerobic digestion processes in a reactor displaying clear signs of inhibition. In fact, GAC demonstrates multiple benefits for anaerobic digestion, such as adsorption of toxic substances, biomass selection, and triggering of direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET).

A new biorefinery approach for the full valorisation of anchovy residues: Use of the sludge generated during the extraction of fish oil as a nitrogen supplement in anaerobic digestion

Paone E.;Mauriello F.;Calabrò P. S.
2021

Abstract

Several anchovies species are captured all over the world; they are consumed fresh but also preserved by the industry, either by brine‐fermentation or canning in oil. The industrial process generates large amounts of residue (about 50% of the original fish biomass) that is generally used to produce fish flour. In this paper, the advancement of a recently proposed process for the full valorisation of anchovies aimed at the extraction of fish oil (to be used as an omega‐3 source) and at the production of biomethane through anaerobic digestion is presented. Particularly, in the experiments presented, a co‐digestion of anchovy sludge—used as a nitrogen supplement—and market waste (5% and 95% on a Total Solids basis) was performed. Since the proposed extraction process uses, as a green‐solvent, d‐limonene, the well‐known problems of toxicity for the anaerobic biomass must be overcome during the digestion process. As discussed below, the granular activated carbon (GAC) is used to reclaim and improve anaerobic digestion processes in a reactor displaying clear signs of inhibition. In fact, GAC demonstrates multiple benefits for anaerobic digestion, such as adsorption of toxic substances, biomass selection, and triggering of direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET).
Anaerobic digestion
Anchovies
Biorefinery
Circular economy
D‐limonene
Granular activated carbon
Inhibition
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12318/109460
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