The green transformation of the built environment is aimed at improving sustainability and can be supported by digitalization, which has become a significant tool to support the supply, integration, and management of information throughout the construction life cycle. In addition, climate change highly affects human comfort in the built environment and different strategies should be evaluated for adapting cities. This paper developed a digital workflow by integrating existing tools (i.e., Grasshopper, Ladybug, Honeybee, and Dragonfly) to evaluate how different green infrastructure strategies affected the thermal comfort by reducing the UTCI. The workflow was applied to a typical historical urban context (Catania, South of Italy), consisting of a square surrounded by three-floor buildings. Three basic scenarios were created that depended on the pavement material used in the built environment: a black stone pavement (reference material from Mount Etna), a permeable pavement, and grass. These three scenarios were combined with different green infrastructure strategies: tree pattern on the square, green walls and green roofs on the surrounding buildings, and the integrations of all these above-mentioned strategies. The results demonstrated that the integration of different green strategies (a grass square instead of pavement, with trees, and green walls and green roofs) increased the thermal comfort by reducing the UTCI by more than 8 degrees C compared to the existing urban context (black stone pavement and building envelope). However, this temperature reduction was highly affected by the location of the human body into the urban context and by the evaporation rates from vegetation. The workflow developed will be useful for designers to evaluate the effectiveness of different green strategies during the early-design stage in mitigating and adapting cities to climate change.

Thermal Comfort in the Built Environment: A Digital Workflow for the Comparison of Different Green Infrastructure Strategies

Cascone S
;
Leuzzo A
2023-01-01

Abstract

The green transformation of the built environment is aimed at improving sustainability and can be supported by digitalization, which has become a significant tool to support the supply, integration, and management of information throughout the construction life cycle. In addition, climate change highly affects human comfort in the built environment and different strategies should be evaluated for adapting cities. This paper developed a digital workflow by integrating existing tools (i.e., Grasshopper, Ladybug, Honeybee, and Dragonfly) to evaluate how different green infrastructure strategies affected the thermal comfort by reducing the UTCI. The workflow was applied to a typical historical urban context (Catania, South of Italy), consisting of a square surrounded by three-floor buildings. Three basic scenarios were created that depended on the pavement material used in the built environment: a black stone pavement (reference material from Mount Etna), a permeable pavement, and grass. These three scenarios were combined with different green infrastructure strategies: tree pattern on the square, green walls and green roofs on the surrounding buildings, and the integrations of all these above-mentioned strategies. The results demonstrated that the integration of different green strategies (a grass square instead of pavement, with trees, and green walls and green roofs) increased the thermal comfort by reducing the UTCI by more than 8 degrees C compared to the existing urban context (black stone pavement and building envelope). However, this temperature reduction was highly affected by the location of the human body into the urban context and by the evaporation rates from vegetation. The workflow developed will be useful for designers to evaluate the effectiveness of different green strategies during the early-design stage in mitigating and adapting cities to climate change.
2023
early-stage design
parametric model
climate change adaptation
human wellbeing
greenspaces
UTCI
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12318/138926
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