† Background and Aims Studies of the plasticity of functional root traits involved in resource acquisition have focused mainly on root length without considering such ‘morphological components’ as biomass allocation, specific root length, root fineness, and tissue density that affect root length. The plasticity of the above components in response to nitrate supply was studied in each root order of two co-generic citrus rootstocks, namely the fastgrowing Citrus jambhiri ‘Rough Lemon’ (RL) and the slow-growing Citrus reshni ‘Cleopatra Mandarin’ (CM). † Methods Morphological traits of individual root orders of CM and RL, grown at different nitrate levels (NO3-N at 0.1, 0.5, 1 and 10 mM) were examined by using an image-specific analysis system. † Key Results At high nitrate levels, the root length ratio, root mass ratio and, to a lesser degree, specific root length, root fineness and tissue density of tap and 1st-order laterals in both CM and RL were reduced. In 2nd-order laterals, however, the same treatment led to increased values of each morphological trait in CM but decreased values of the same traits in RL. At low nitrate supply, CM exhibited longer tap roots whereas RL developed longer 2nd-order laterals. These effects were due to root mass ratio and, to a lesser extent, specific root length. †Conclusions Biomass allocation was the main component of nitrate-induced changes in root length ratio. The 2nd-order laterals were more sensitive to nitrate availability than the tap root and 1st-order laterals. At low nitrate availability, RL displayed longer 2nd-order lateral roots and lower root plasticity than CM. This suggests a different root growth strategy among citrus rootstocks for adapting to nitrate availability: RL invests in 2nd-order laterals, the preferred zone for acquiring the nutrient, whereas CM responds with longer tap roots

Comparing morphological plasticity of root orders in slow- and fast-growing citrus rootstocks supplied with different nitrate levels

ABENAVOLI, Maria Rosa;SORGONA', Agostino;
2007

Abstract

† Background and Aims Studies of the plasticity of functional root traits involved in resource acquisition have focused mainly on root length without considering such ‘morphological components’ as biomass allocation, specific root length, root fineness, and tissue density that affect root length. The plasticity of the above components in response to nitrate supply was studied in each root order of two co-generic citrus rootstocks, namely the fastgrowing Citrus jambhiri ‘Rough Lemon’ (RL) and the slow-growing Citrus reshni ‘Cleopatra Mandarin’ (CM). † Methods Morphological traits of individual root orders of CM and RL, grown at different nitrate levels (NO3-N at 0.1, 0.5, 1 and 10 mM) were examined by using an image-specific analysis system. † Key Results At high nitrate levels, the root length ratio, root mass ratio and, to a lesser degree, specific root length, root fineness and tissue density of tap and 1st-order laterals in both CM and RL were reduced. In 2nd-order laterals, however, the same treatment led to increased values of each morphological trait in CM but decreased values of the same traits in RL. At low nitrate supply, CM exhibited longer tap roots whereas RL developed longer 2nd-order laterals. These effects were due to root mass ratio and, to a lesser extent, specific root length. †Conclusions Biomass allocation was the main component of nitrate-induced changes in root length ratio. The 2nd-order laterals were more sensitive to nitrate availability than the tap root and 1st-order laterals. At low nitrate availability, RL displayed longer 2nd-order lateral roots and lower root plasticity than CM. This suggests a different root growth strategy among citrus rootstocks for adapting to nitrate availability: RL invests in 2nd-order laterals, the preferred zone for acquiring the nutrient, whereas CM responds with longer tap roots
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12318/3654
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