Sexting has been commonly defined as the sharing of sexually suggestive content via new technologies. The relationship between sexting motivations and both online and offline aggressive behaviors (i.e., sexual harassment, dating violence, and bullying) is still understudied. This study aimed to investigate the association between three sexting motivations—sexual purposes, instrumental/aggravated reasons, and body image reinforcement—and teen dating violence. Specifically, only instrumental/aggravated motivations—such as sexting in exchange for something, under pressure, or with harmful intentions—were expected to be related to dating violence perpetration and victimization. The participants were 171 adolescents aged from 13 to 20 years. Having sent sexts during the last year and having had a dating relationship were inclusive criteria. The Sexting Motivations Questionnaire and the Conflict in Adolescent Dating Relationship Inventory were administered via an online survey. Two hierarchical regression analyses were run to investigate whether the three sexting motivations (i.e., sexual purposes, instrumental/aggravated reasons, and body image reinforcement) predict, respectively, victimization and perpetration of teen dating violence, controlling for sex, age, and relationship duration. Dating violence perpetration was predicted by sexting for instrumental/aggravated reasons, as well as by sex and relationship duration. Dating violence victimization was predicted by sexting for instrumental/aggravated reasons, as well as by age and relationship duration. These findings expand literature about sexting motivations and aggressive behaviors suggesting that instrumental/aggravated reasons are an index of aggressive/exploitative tendencies, which also lead to dating violence. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed

A bad romance. Sexting motivations and teen dating violence

Nappa M. R.;
2018

Abstract

Sexting has been commonly defined as the sharing of sexually suggestive content via new technologies. The relationship between sexting motivations and both online and offline aggressive behaviors (i.e., sexual harassment, dating violence, and bullying) is still understudied. This study aimed to investigate the association between three sexting motivations—sexual purposes, instrumental/aggravated reasons, and body image reinforcement—and teen dating violence. Specifically, only instrumental/aggravated motivations—such as sexting in exchange for something, under pressure, or with harmful intentions—were expected to be related to dating violence perpetration and victimization. The participants were 171 adolescents aged from 13 to 20 years. Having sent sexts during the last year and having had a dating relationship were inclusive criteria. The Sexting Motivations Questionnaire and the Conflict in Adolescent Dating Relationship Inventory were administered via an online survey. Two hierarchical regression analyses were run to investigate whether the three sexting motivations (i.e., sexual purposes, instrumental/aggravated reasons, and body image reinforcement) predict, respectively, victimization and perpetration of teen dating violence, controlling for sex, age, and relationship duration. Dating violence perpetration was predicted by sexting for instrumental/aggravated reasons, as well as by sex and relationship duration. Dating violence victimization was predicted by sexting for instrumental/aggravated reasons, as well as by age and relationship duration. These findings expand literature about sexting motivations and aggressive behaviors suggesting that instrumental/aggravated reasons are an index of aggressive/exploitative tendencies, which also lead to dating violence. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed
adolescents
dating violence
domestic violence
Internet and abuse
media and violence
sexual harassment
sexuality
Clinical Psychology
Applied Psychology
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12318/60685
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