This study analyses the quantitative and qualitative characteristics of citrus peel waste and discusses the systems for its valorisation. Citrus peel waste (CPW) is the main residue of the citrus processing industries and is characterised by a seasonal production (which often requires biomass storage) as well as high water content and concentration of essential oils. The disposal of CPW has considerable constraints due to both economic and environmental factors. Currently this residue is mainly used as food for animals, thanks to its nutritional capacity. If enough agricultural land is available close to the processing industries, the use of CPW as organic soil conditioner or as substrate for compost production is also possible, thus improving the organic matter content of the soil. Recently, the possibility of its valorisation for biomethane or bioethanol production has been evaluated by several studies, but currently more research is needed to overcome the toxic effects of the essential oils on the microbial community. Considering the high added value of the compounds that can be recovered from CPW, it has promising potential uses: in the food industry (for production of pectin, dietary fibres, etc.), and in the cosmetic and pharmaceutic industries (extraction of flavonoids, flavouring agents and citric acid). However, in many cases, these uses are still not economically sustainable.

Valorisation of citrus processing waste: A review

Zema D;Calabrò P. S.
;
Tamburino V;Zimbone S. M.
2018

Abstract

This study analyses the quantitative and qualitative characteristics of citrus peel waste and discusses the systems for its valorisation. Citrus peel waste (CPW) is the main residue of the citrus processing industries and is characterised by a seasonal production (which often requires biomass storage) as well as high water content and concentration of essential oils. The disposal of CPW has considerable constraints due to both economic and environmental factors. Currently this residue is mainly used as food for animals, thanks to its nutritional capacity. If enough agricultural land is available close to the processing industries, the use of CPW as organic soil conditioner or as substrate for compost production is also possible, thus improving the organic matter content of the soil. Recently, the possibility of its valorisation for biomethane or bioethanol production has been evaluated by several studies, but currently more research is needed to overcome the toxic effects of the essential oils on the microbial community. Considering the high added value of the compounds that can be recovered from CPW, it has promising potential uses: in the food industry (for production of pectin, dietary fibres, etc.), and in the cosmetic and pharmaceutic industries (extraction of flavonoids, flavouring agents and citric acid). However, in many cases, these uses are still not economically sustainable.
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
Zema_2018_WM_Valorisation_editor.pdf

non disponibili

Descrizione: Versione dell'editore
Tipologia: Versione Editoriale (PDF)
Licenza: Tutti i diritti riservati (All rights reserved)
Dimensione 835.99 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
835.99 kB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia
Zema_2018_WM_Valorisation_post.pdf

embargo fino al 31/12/2021

Tipologia: Documento in Post-print
Licenza: Creative commons
Dimensione 930.45 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
930.45 kB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12318/977
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 161
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 150
social impact